Zen Blog

This blog collects various internet feeds aimed towards information, experience and technique exchange in support of our shared spiritual journey.....

”Namaste - may the light in me, honor the light in you…”

Marketing Coordinator

Come join the dynamic team at Mindful—a mission-driven media company that is dedicated to sharing secular mindfulness to support good health, positive relationships and a compassionate society. With a monthly audience of over two million, this is a chance to make a real impact! You’ll enjoy our positive, flexible and collaborative work culture. 

We’re seeking a Marketing Coordinator based in Halifax, NS. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated to execute marketing strategies that foster inspiration and engagement and to run campaigns that are audience-centered and data-driven. You’ll thrive in an ever-changing, fast-paced environment. You’ll see problems as opportunities and offer ideas and solutions that help drive campaign success. You’ll work well both collaboratively and independently as needed. 

Key Responsibilities:

Plan and manage assigned marketing projects including the development of marketing plans, promotions, and engagement activities.Support the implementation of promotional campaigns in collaboration with other Mindful departments and/or external partners to develop content and marketing materials.Assist in managing Mindful’s digital presence, including website updates, customer relationship management (CRM) platforms and social media execution.Manage marketing email campaigns. Track performance through digital analytics.Write, edit, and design marketing promotions, newsletters, and other digital media materials as assigned.Any other duties as requested.

Qualifications and skills:

Some relevant promotional and/or marketing experience. Superior project management skills with knowledge/experience in business-to-consumer (B2C) marketing, marketing campaign management, design and content writing.Ability to excel in a fast-paced, deadline-driven environment. Confidence in evaluating options and making recommendations on proposed solutions.

Nice-to-haves:

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How to Take Back Attention

We are living through a quiet crisis of attention and ironically many of us don’t even notice. In previous posts, I’ve written about the essential importance of attention. Quality of attention is the foundation for not only effective action but also experiencing a sense of well-being, purpose, and meaning. More skillfully handling attention is one of the essential management challenges of our day.

Since my article on attention, several readers have told me that they never connected their frenetic days and frazzled feelings to their poor use of attention. But in retrospect, it seems an obvious relationship.

Skillfully handling attention is one of the essential management challenges of our day.

We are largely an attention illiterate society. When I raise this to executive or professional audiences I’m speaking to, usually two distinct reactions emerge.

The first is, “Yeah, this is nuts! What are we doing to ourselves?” The president of a manufacturing company related a story of walking into the weekly leadership meeting of a firm his had recently taken over. They were “a two-hour free for all” where “nothing of much substance happened.” “It wasn’t a big surprise why they were performing so poorly,” he said.

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A Timely and Important Book “Fallout: Recovering from Abuse in Tibetan Buddhism”

Guest Post By Joanne Clark

Fallout: Recovering from Abuse in Tibetan Buddhism, by Tahlia Newland, is the story of Rigpa students coming to terms with disclosures of Sogyal Lakar’s abuses over decades, as revealed in the letter from eight senior ex-students in July 2017. This is the story of renegade students, students who refuse to participate in a religious institution that condones abuse—and the courage, wisdom, self-reflection, compassion and robust spirit of inquiry that shines through this book reminds me again and again that Buddha himself was a renegade, founding a religion outside of institutions, royal pomp, ceremony, and political power. This is a book that Rigpa management, Sogyal Lakar and the Tibetan Buddhist community need to read and ponder, as the insights it contains are pertinent to all who care about the authentic transmission of Buddhism to the West.

This is also the story of Rigpa’s tragic failure as a religious institution to protect students from harm and Sogyal’s failure to abide by even the most basic ethical boundaries of the Dharma. We learn how both Rigpa and Sogyal have failed to adequately address the present concerns of this group of long-time, now ex-students, many of whom are survivors of Sogyal’s abuse, suffering from severe trauma and seeking validation. We learn also how they have demeaned, attacked and dismissed this group, many of whom devoted long years of their lives working for Rigpa.

The story begins shortly before the publication of the letter, at the moment when Newland first discovers that Sogyal has been hitting students for decades. We follow her personal, painful process of coming to terms with this and then, with the letter published, the story becomes much bigger, becoming the story of many—of the “What Now?” group– ex-Rigpa students forming communities of blogs and Facebook groups under the leadership of Newland and others in order to find support and move forward in meaningful ways.

This is not a story of gripe sessions, not about angry ex-students, though certainly some have had their periods of anger and there is plenty to be angry about. This is an account of students making meaning out of trauma and abuse, students working to hold a perpetrator to full account and understand the beliefs, manipulations and deceptions that held them hostage, that allowed such abuses to occur. And it is a true story. As one commenter, quoted in the book, stated:

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Cutting Through Indecision & Overthinking

By Leo Babauta

I’ve been working with a few people who are very intelligent, very competent, and very talented — but they get stuck in indecision and analysis paralysis.

In effect, overthinking and getting lost in endless options reduces their effectiveness and intelligence by producing inaction.

Taking any action is likely to be better than inaction and indecision, but we can get so caught up in trying to find the perfect decision that we make no decision.

The answer is to cut through the indecision and overthinking with action.

Before we talk about that, let’s look at what’s going on with smart, competent people who get stuck in their beautiful minds.

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Why Listening is the Most Radical Act

Pain and suffering may often seem to be calling us to jump in and fix things, but perhaps they are asking us first to be still enough to hear what can really help, what can truly get to the cause of this suffering, what will not only eliminate it now but prevent it from returning. So, before we act, we need to listen. When we do become quiet enough and “listen up,” the way opens, and we see the possibilities for action.

We give very little attention to learning to listen, learning to really hear another person or situation. Yet think back to the moments with other people when our hearts were engaged and we felt fed by being together. In those moments, weren’t we hearing one another? In times like those, when we have listened to and heard one another, we have felt life arising from a shared perspective.

Why We Miss New Opportunities

Each situation, each moment of life, is new. We and this other person or group of people have never been here before. Oh, we’ve been in moments like it, but the present moment is new even if we have performed the same action with the same person hundreds of times before. Of course, it’s easy to think, “Well, it’s just like the last time, so I’ll do what I did last time,” and then not have to listen to the new moment. But if we do that, our lives become boring replications of what we have always done before, and we miss the possibilities of surprise, of new and more creative solutions, of mystery.

For our often humdrum lives to retain the taste of living truth, we have to listen freshly—again and again.

For our often humdrum lives to retain the taste of living truth, we have to listen freshly—again and again. A human interaction includes both the uniqueness of each being and the unity of the two, which transcends the separateness. For our minds to take such a subtle process and trivialize it to “just this again” or “nothing but that” is to reduce us to automatons, to objects for one another. And for action to be compassionate, we need to eliminate the idea of object, we need to be here together doing exactly what needs to be done in the simplest way we can. We need to listen.

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