Zen Blog

This blog collects various internet feeds aimed towards information, experience and technique exchange in support of our shared spiritual journey.....

”Namaste - may the light in me, honor the light in you…”

Merger of Mindful and LifeXT Creates World’s Largest Mindfulness Training and Media Company

Chicago, July 30, 2020 – At a time when mindfulness is more valuable and sought after than ever before, two leading organizations are merging to create better access to the most comprehensive and impactful content regarding self-actuated mental health.

The new company, Mindful Communications, is formed from the merger of the media enterprise that includes Mindful Magazine and mindful.org, with LifeXT, a leading corporate-training organization. The merger creates the largest and most comprehensive enterprise in the field with more than 9,000 pieces of content, state of the art technology and a monthly audience of more than 2 million individuals. Mindful Communications offers relevant courses, corporate training, consumer media, licensed content, business media, events, and directories.

Abundant Venture Partners co-founder Eric Langshur, a lead investor in the new company, said, “Now more than ever, people are seeking the benefits of mindfulness – equanimity, compassion and self-actuated mental health. In this merger, we see the opportunity to dramatically expand the availability of effective tools supported by scientific evidence. Mindful and LifeXT represent the highest standards in the field with a great team of long-time practitioners of meditation and mindfulness. We intend to make these assets available to billions of people around the world in the places where they live and work.”

Former Mindful CEO Bryan Welch will continue as CEO of Mindful Communications and LifeXT CEO Brenda Jacobsen joins Mindful as President.

For more information contact Bryan Welch at [email protected] (785-249-0609) or Brenda Jacobsen at [email protected]

Original author: Mindful Staff
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5 Mindful Habits to Fight Bias Every Day

If you’re determined to take a real stand against anti-Black racism, there’s plenty of work to be done. Some of that work might start with recognizing that we all have internalized prejudice. And this can perpetuate racist behavior—from the individual level of microaggressions, all the way to ingrained systemic problems, like police brutality and opportunity hoarding.

Don’t be discouraged. The science of implicit biases helps us to understand why this is, and how we can harness mindfulness to help us show up for the work of anti-racism, even when it’s difficult.

Why We’re Biased

Implicit or “unconscious” biases are automatic, internal processes that associate certain characteristics with members of a specific social group. A significant body of research demonstrates that all people have biases, and that our biases unconsciously influence behavior.

This doesn’t mean that unconscious bias is always maladaptive. For example, unconscious biases that activate feelings of love and care toward friends enable us to be kind without consciously trying. But many of our biases are far more harmful. We learn what we are exposed to, and the culture most of us grew up in is quite literally built upon racism, as well as a host of other unjust prejudices.

Understanding Debiasing

A growing body of evidence suggests unconscious biases are so deeply internalized that gaining awareness of them isn’t always enough to make them disappear.

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What is the Best Mindfulness Practice for Your Myers-Briggs Personality?

I’m an MBTI junky—which means I see the world through the mental lens of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and how our behavior is influenced by our MBTI type.

When I was trying to get back into meditating a few years ago, I read Dan Harris’s book, 10% Happier. His approach to how and why he meditates made so much sense to me. It motivated me to get back to meditating in a way that no other meditation book had. And it made my MBTI mindset start thinking about applying type to meditation. What if I could help people connect with a mindfulness or meditation practice better because it resonated with their MBTI type? Maybe that would help people to stay with the practice long enough to create a habit and reap the benefits of mindfulness and meditation.

What is MBTI?

It’s a personality type assessment based on psychologist Carl Jung’s personality theories and adapted by Isabel Briggs Myers and her mother, Katharine Briggs. It is a widely-recognized tool for:

Personal self-awarenessCareer explorationPartners to understand each other betterTeams to improve communication and collaborationManagers to incorporate into their supervisory styles

The test is popular among seekers, leadership and development professionals, and HR directors, and can provide helpful insights in our personality quirks, though it should be noted the science around the reliability of the test is open to question. That said, it can be an awful lot of fun to take the test and see where you land. And while certain types of meditation have been found to resonate with certain MBTI types, there is no hard and fast matching of type to specific mindfulness or meditation techniques. People are drawn to types of mindfulness and meditation for numerous reasons beyond temperament, including first exposure, the appeal of meditation teacher, what’s in vogue at the time, what they’ve discovered in their own sampling of meditation techniques, and what they’ve found that works for them. 

What is Mindfulness and Meditation?

Mindfulness is being fully present, non judgmentally. It’s building awareness about your emotions, physical sensations, and thoughts as well as the surrounding environment. The more you practice mindfulness, the more you can:

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4 Ways to Awaken Your Intention

Though I deeply appreciate how my mindfulness practice provides me with tremendous support in the midst of current challenges, it is specifically the questions around intention that have deepened that practice and enhanced my capacity to choose how I relate to this moment. What is my intention in these unprecedented times? And how does my practice help me orient in that direction?

As wise teachers have said, everything arises at the tip of intention. This has never been more evident to me than it is right now.

The reality is, I can do virtually nothing about much of what is unfolding.

What I can do is cultivate the ability, moment by moment, to choose how I relate to this experience. One element of consciously choosing how to relate and respond to the world means I’m frequently asking myself, again and again: How do I want to respond to these challenging times? What is my intention in the midst of it all, and how does my practice support me? Can I “let be” and relax with this level of uncertainty and how does my intention support me in doing just that?  

Can I cultivate self-compassion and compassion for others as we all navigate this uncharted territory? And can I begin again when I feel that I have strayed from my intention (which, if I am being totally honest, has certainly happened countless times)? The reminder here is that intention is pointing in a direction, it’s a north star, not a destination. If I am paying attention when I get off course, which will inevitably happen, I can always make a course correction.

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3 Mindful Ways to Learn from Cancel Culture

We’ve probably all heard about instances of some celebrity or other getting “canceled.” Besides being a dramatic social-media call-out, what does “cancel culture” say, and how can we respond to it?

First, we have to understand the basic assumptions that underlie “canceling”: X person has shown that they will not change their harmful behavior (often harming people with less power and influence than themselves). Therefore, the only recourse is to publicly shame them—a reaction that’s not unique to this age of internet. 

As we look to the dream of creating a more just, equitable world than we’ve ever lived in, grappling with this trend is surprisingly helpful. Because our feeling of personal okay-ness is innately tied to feeling we are liked and accepted by others, realizing that some aspects of how we show up in the world actually do harm others can be deeply painful. It might even feel like who you are has been canceled. Cue emotions of panic, denial, guilt, groundlessness. 

It’s a lot to process. But here’s the response part. You can accept all of those stormy emotions, honor them, and still not “cancel” yourself. In other words, don’t accept the belief that you yourself are beyond the ability to grow through this moment.

As the visionary author and Afrofuturist Octavia E. Butler wrote, “The only lasting truth is Change.” Whatever critique you get, who you are is a person capable of resilience, learning, and aligning more deeply with compassion. That, friend, is the polar opposite of canceled. 

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