Zen Blog

This blog collects various internet feeds aimed towards information, experience and technique exchange in support of our shared spiritual journey.....

”Namaste - may the light in me, honor the light in you…”

How a Money Conversation Can Transform Your Relationships

In the age of digital media, many people seem quite comfortable sharing intimate details of their lives: whom they are voting for, how they look upon waking in the morning (and with whom), the contents of their closet. But who freely shares how much money they have in the bank, how much they get paid, and how much credit card debt they owe?

As a culture, we’re scared to talk about money. It’s primal. Money means survival. Without it, we may die. Talking about money can threaten our sense of inner worthiness (“I don’t have enough” or “I have too much and should be sharing it more”), and that can trigger our ancestral fight-or-flight response.  It’s that fight-or-flight response or fear that keeps us from talking about or mindfully engaging with money.

But, will that path of avoidance or reactivity bring you freedom and spaciousness? I fell in love with meditation practice when my teacher said “Mindfulness is meant to illuminate all topics, not just the comfortable ones.” The benefits of practice come from inviting all feelings to visit and shining the light of awareness on the scariest ones.

It’s that fight-or-flight response or fear that keeps us from talking about or mindfully engaging with money.

Particularly at this time of financial uncertainty and loss, how do we bring our full and open receptiveness to all that is arising in our financial lives? The COVID-19 pandemic, though an uninvited guest, bears gifts of more time and less travel, the ability to discern value beyond money (like the importance of friendship, our health, and our sense of humor), and the recognition that we can live with less. With fewer distractions, this moment offers a boundless opportunity to deepen our connection to our closest friends, work colleagues, family members, and ourselves, to cultivate a freedom in the midst of upset, shame, numbness, or guilt—whatever is arising. The courage to be present with and to voice our discomfort with money has the potential to liberate all of us.

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5 Benefits of Mindfulness for Black, Indigenous, Women of Color

Mindfulness is the act of being attentive to yourself. In the noise of the world, it’s taking a moment to tune everything around you out and tune in to yourself.

That’s not easy.

Though for some the pandemic provided a much-needed interruption, the “rise and grind” mentality and routine has continued to permeate our lives. “Hustle culture” pushes the narrative that being busy is a measurement of achievement and success, and anything that conflicts with our ability to work must be pushed to the side.

The kinds of thoughts, feelings, and emotions that conflict with work are increasingly prevalent due to the coronavirus. This can come in the form of worries about your personal and loved ones’ health and well-being, with COVID-19 being such a new virus that is disproportionately impacting Black and brown communities. It could be stress due to such a quick shift from a familiar daily rhythm to most of the world shutting down. Maybe it’s pressure from losing a job, working from home for the first time, or suddenly teaching your kids school. All of this created so much stress and worry—all of which is piled on top of our hustle lifestyle.

However, the very same thoughts, feelings, and emotions that this lifestyle makes us inclined to ignore are an important sign that it’s time to slow down and listen.

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10-Minute Meditation to Ground, Breathe, Soothe

There’s a number of mindfulness-based strategies that can help settle us when fear is really strong. And the practices can be combined or sequenced in any way that you find effective.

It’s ideal to develop a familiarity and skill with these strategies when you’re not feeling strong fear so that they’re available to you when they’re most needed. So let’s start with a short mindfulness practice that helps bring us here into our body, in this moment.

1. Finding a comfortable posture with both feet on the floor, allow the eyes to gently close. Or, lower your gaze.

2. Now bring attention to the areas of contact that your feet have with the floor. Feel into your feet, noticing the solidity of the ground under them. Maybe feeling where your shoes are in contact with your feet.

3. And now moving on to the thighs and where the body meets the chair. Notice where there is contact with the chair, just allowing the ground and the chair to hold and support your body without you needing to do anything.

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Associate Editor

The primary responsibility of the Associate Editor, Mindful Communications, is to help with the production of Mindful.org and Mindful Magazine. The associate editor assists in the building and scheduling of mindful.org articles, newsletters, and social media posts while supporting editorial calendars and production flows. The associate editor also assists in the production, copyediting, and writing of articles for Mindful magazine and other Mindful products. The person in this position executes their duties under the supervision of the Executive Editor and may be assigned duties beyond the scope of this description.

Key Duties: 

Builds articles in CMS and schedules themBrainstorms and pitches content ideas for the website, the magazine, and other Mindful productsEdits and/or proofreads manuscripts and other forms of copy for publication in the magazine and online, making stylistic, structural and grammatical corrections, as well as other substantive changes as needed.Creates and tracks invoices for digital assignmentsAssists in the creation of content for internal presentationsAssists with social media scheduling and post creationSupports Art team by researching stock images Participates in team meetings and presentationsParticipates in production of editorial events and initiatives (eg. Mindful30 meditation challenge, Mindful courses, Mindful Live events etc.)Collaborates with business development, circulation, advertising, marketing, and print teamsHelps transition the website for each new issue publication: building issue posts online including new heds, deks and images as requiredModerates social media comments, Mindful social group pages, and live eventsAssists in the production of the email campaigns including Monday Weekly Wakeup Newsletter and the Tuesday Weekly Newsletter, as well as advertising, marketing, and business development newsletters

Recommended qualifications:

A familiarity with (and ideally experience practicing) mindfulness and meditation Strong writing skills – able to write for daily deadlinesContent management system experienceExperience and enthusiasm for posting to social media platformsBasic proficiency in audio and video production and editingBasic knowledge of photo editing for online use

Skills and qualities: 

Digitally savvyAbility to juggle multiple projects and prioritize tasksFast, fluent writer Time managementWillingness to learn new digital technologiesResearch and analysisDecision-making CommunicationWorking both independently and collaboratively

Helpful Notes:

Our office is based in Halifax, Nova Scotia. While preference may be given to qualified, local candidates, we are open to remote applicants as well.Mindful is an equal opportunity employer. We welcome applicants who are Black, Indigenous, people of color, visible minorities, persons with disabilities, as well as members of the 2SLGBTQIA+ community.We cannot sponsor applicants for immigration to Canada at this time.


Interested in Applying? Please send your resume and cover letter to [email protected]
Applications will be accepted until Monday August 31 at 5 PM AST.

Thank you for your interest in working with Mindful.

Original author: Mindful Staff
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Guided Meditation: Offering Loving-Kindness to Yourself and Others

Loving-kindness is a practice and technique where the central object we rest our attention on is the silent repetition of certain phrases. And the phrases are a way of offering, gift giving, and switching our attention. So for example, if we normally think about the mistakes we’ve made, what we did wrong, and when we failed, we’re going to switch our attention and just wish ourselves well.

You may use the phrases: May I be safe. May I be happy. May I be healthy. May I live my life with ease.

Many people ask me, “Well, who am I asking?” We’re not asking anybody, we’re offering. We’re gift giving. And then we wish others well. It may be people who’ve helped us, who we take for granted, tend to overlook, or people we don’t really know. There are many phases and stages of the practice, but we’ll begin with the offering of loving-kindness to ourselves. We’ll end with the offering of loving-kindness to all people everywhere.

1. To begin, you can sit comfortably. Many of you may have your own loving-kindness practice, and it’s fine just to continue on. Common phrases you would repeat are things like, May I be safe, be happy, be healthy, and live with ease. Live with ease means: May the things in day-to-day life not be a struggle. 

2. May I be safe, be happy, be healthy, live with ease. You can silently repeat these phrases or whatever phrases you’ve chosen. Gather all of your attention behind one phrase at a time. You don’t have to try to force a special feeling, the power of the practice is in that gathering. And when your attention wanders—because it will—don’t worry about it. See if you can gently let go and just return your attention to the phrases.

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